Concept Cards

A picture game for young children that builds reasoning skills and sharpens concept formation.

ladybug

Download the two .pdf files and print out ConceptcardsFront.pdf first (click the link to download the file). Reload the seven printed sheets back in the printer and print out ConceptcardsBack.pdf on the back of the printed sheets.
On each sheet will be six pictures with some words describing them on the back. Cut out the six pictures on each sheet. You can use the words on the back to begin practice, but there are many more concepts that I’ve not listed. I’ve included some unusual objects to make it more or less difficult. The goal is to verbally describe (not point at) the reason you’ve grouped the pictures you have. This is the beginning of argumentation using supporting facts.
How to play
You can use a minimum of two cards, or the whole set of 42–Numbers are on the back of each card. Examples follow:
Adult (chooses cards 6, 10, 21, 26, shows them to child) “What do these things have in common?”
Child: “They are all animals.”

Adult (chooses cards 6, 25, 28, shows them to child) “What do these things have in common?”
Child: “They are all birds.”

Adult (chooses cards 1, 16, 24, 26, 38, 39, shows them to child) “What do these things have in common?”
Child: “They are all animals that live in water.”

Adult (chooses cards 17, 30, 34, 35, 36, shows them to child) “What do these things have in common?”
Child: “They are all tools.” or “They are all things that people make.”

Adult (chooses cards 9, 10, 26, 41, shows them to child) “What do these things have in common?”
Child: “They all have stripes.” or “They are all animals.”

Also, you can do the venerable Sesame Street scenario with four objects, one which is not the same as the other three. Or, you can pick out some images that are similar, and ask the kid to add to the selection you chose with another picture they think is similar in the same way. So, if you choose some striped pictures, as in the last example, the child can pick out the snake, the butterfly, or even most of the vehicle pictures, which also contain stripes.
The goal is to be able to verbally point out why the object satisfies the question. This is the goal of creating an argument for why the child believes what it does, and pointing just won’t do. The statements have to show that the child is using knowledge already known (such as what an “animal” is), or what is presented in the picture (those pictures with striped objects)

You can also turn tables and have your child quiz you.
(all images are corel clip art)